Robert Mugabe's resignation letter in full

A transcript of President Robert Mugabe's letter of resignation, as read by Zimbabwean parliament speaker Jacob Mudenda.

    Jacob Mudenda, speaker of Zimbabwe's parliament, reading Mugabe's letter [Reuters]
    Jacob Mudenda, speaker of Zimbabwe's parliament, reading Mugabe's letter [Reuters]

    Celebrations erupted at a special session of Zimbabwe's parliament as speaker Jacob Mudenda read out Robert Mugabe's resignation letter, which ended the veteran leader's 37-year reign over the country.

    The announcement on Tuesday was made as parliament launched proceedings to impeach the 93-year-old president.

    Below is a transcript of Mugabe's letter of resignation, as it was read by Mudenda:

    Notice of resignation as President of the Republic of Zimbabwe

    In terms of the provisions of Section 96, Sub-Section 1, of the Constitution of Zimbabwe, amendment number 20, 2013.

    Following my verbal communication with the Speaker of the National Assembly, Advocate Jacob Mudenda at 13:53 hours, 21st November, 2017 intimating my intention to resign as the President of the Republic of Zimbabwe, I, Robert Gabriel Mugabe, in terms of Section 96, Sub-Section 1 of the Constitution of Zimbabwe, hereby formally tender my resignation as the President of the Republic of Zimbabwe with immediate effect.

    My decision to resign is voluntary on my part and arises from my concern for the welfare of the people of Zimbabwe and my desire to ensure a smooth, peaceful and non-violent transfer of power that underpins national security, peace and stability.

    Kindly give public notice of my resignation as soon as possible as required by Section 96, Sub-Section 1 of the Constitution of Zimbabwe.

    Yours faithfully,

    Robert Gabriel Mugabe, President of the Republic of Zimbabwe.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera News


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