Scores feared dead in Nigeria gas tanker fire

At least 100 people queuing to refill gas tankers ahead of Christmas reported to have died, with many also injured.

    Muhammadu Buhari's office said "tens of people" who had been looking forward to their Christmas celebrations had been killed [AP]
    Muhammadu Buhari's office said "tens of people" who had been looking forward to their Christmas celebrations had been killed [AP]

    A gas tanker truck ignited an inferno at a crowded industrial gas plant in Nigeria, reportedly killing more than 100 people lining up to refill their cooking gas cylinders.

    The disaster took place on Thursday in Nnewi, a predominantly Christian community in southeast Nigeria, as residents were rushing to refill their gas cylinders in time for Christmas.

    The extent of the death toll was not immediately clear.

    By the time firefighters managed to put out the blaze, an Associated Press reporter said they counted the remains of more than 100 corpses.

    But in an interview with Al Jazeera, the plant's manager Peter Nwosu said he was unable to confirm the toll.

    He denied reports that the death toll had surpassed 100 and said more details would be known following an assessment at the site on Friday morning.

    The naij.com Nigerian news site said the dead and badly burned victims were taken to Nnamdi Azikwe University Teaching Hospital.

    According to a witness quoted on the site, the accident happened at 11am local time on Thursday.

     

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    FGM: The last cutting season

    FGM: The last cutting season

    Maasai women are spearheading an alternative rite of passage that excludes female genital mutilation.

    'No girl is safe': The mothers ironing their daughters' breasts

    Victims of breast ironing: It felt like 'fire'

    Cameroonian girls are enduring a painful daily procedure with long lasting physical and psychological consequences.

    Could mega-dams kill the mighty River Nile?

    Could mega-dams kill the mighty River Nile?

    For Ethiopia, a new dam holds the promise of much-needed electricity; for Egypt, the fear of a devastating water crisis.