South Korean parliament assembly in deadlock after violence

So-called Anti-Scuffling Law of 2012 was meant to make scenes like this a thing of the past.

    South Korea's National Assembly has been in deadlock for days because of a power struggle between political parties.

    Politicians have been reporting each other for acts of violence, in scenes that are reminiscent of the parliament's violent past.

    This is all over an electoral reform bill which the ruling alliance wants to pass in time for national elections next year.

    And which the opposition parties seem determined to stop, any way they can.

     

    Al Jazeera’s Rob McBride reports from Seoul.


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Learn what India's parties' symbols mean by drawing them

    Learn what India's parties' symbols mean by drawing them

    More than 2,300 political parties have registered for the largest electoral exercise in the world.

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Since March 2015, Saudi Arabia and a coalition of Arab states have launched more than 19,278 air raids across Yemen.

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    No, it wasn't because of WMDs, democracy or Iraqi oil. The real reason is much more sinister than that.