South Korean parliament assembly in deadlock after violence

So-called Anti-Scuffling Law of 2012 was meant to make scenes like this a thing of the past.

    South Korea's National Assembly has been in deadlock for days because of a power struggle between political parties.

    Politicians have been reporting each other for acts of violence, in scenes that are reminiscent of the parliament's violent past.

    This is all over an electoral reform bill which the ruling alliance wants to pass in time for national elections next year.

    And which the opposition parties seem determined to stop, any way they can.

     

    Al Jazeera’s Rob McBride reports from Seoul.


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