Bhutan development tops agenda in election

The economy and environment are many voter's primary concerns in one of the world's youngest democracies.

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    It has one of the youngest democracies in the world and now Bhutan is about to choose a new government, which would be only its third since voters first got to decide who leads back in 2008.

    The health of the economy and the environment are at the forefront of many voter’s concerns. While the country has experienced economic growth lately, there is a fierce political debate about how to maintain that growth while protecting the environment and the nation's unique cultural heritage.

     

    Al Jazeera's Neave Barker reports from Bhutan's capital, Thimphu.


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