Trump's military parade to be held in November, but without tanks

According to a Pentagon memo, tanks will not be included to 'minimise the damage done to local infrastructure'.

    President Donald Trump allegedly got the idea for a military parade after attending similar activities during Bastille Day with French President Emmanuel Macron [Charles Platiau/Reuters]
    President Donald Trump allegedly got the idea for a military parade after attending similar activities during Bastille Day with French President Emmanuel Macron [Charles Platiau/Reuters]

    The US Department of Defense will hold a military parade in November, but will not include tanks, a Pentagon memo said. 

    US President Donald Trump called for the parade last month.

    The idea for the show of military might apparently came after Trump visited France last July for Bastille Day celebrations.

    According to the Pentagon memo, released on Friday, the parade route will go from White House to the Capitol in Washington, DC, on November 11 - US Veteran's Day. 

    The parade will not include tanks, however, in an effort to "minimise the damage done to local infrastructure".

    To make up for the lack of tanks, the end of the parade will feature a "heavy air component", including older aircraft.

    The memo also said the parade will "highlight the evolution of women veterans from separate formations in World War II to today's integrated formations".

    The memo did not include the cost estimate of the parade. 

    Military parades are rare in the US despite boasting the world's most powerful armed forces.

    The last major military parade in Washington, DC, took place in 1991, after the Gulf War. It cost more than $8m, which would be significantly more in today's dollars. 

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    In February, Trump officially told his generals to start working on plans for the parade.

    Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said Trump's intention was to have "a celebration" of the military.

    Trump has frequently touted his support for the US military and placed high-ranking generals in top White House and cabinet posts.  

    Opponents have criticised the idea of the parade, drawing comparisons to autocratic displays that occur in nations such as China and North Korea.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera News


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