Togo's president defiant in first speech since protests

Togo's President Faure Gnassingbe has spoken publicly for the first time since a wave of demonstrations calling for the end of the "Gnassingbe dynasty" began in August.

    Togo's President Faure Gnassingbe has spoken publicly for the first time since a wave of demonstrations calling for the end of the 'Gnassingbe dynasty' began in August.

    "You will agree with me that we are going through a tough political crisis in the country […] we have to be bold, courageous and patient to embrace this situation," Gnassingbe told his party's annual congress.

    In August, two opposition protesters were killed and 13 others wounded when security forces opened fire to break up protests.

    Gnassingbe took power in 2005 after the death of his father, Gnassingbe Eyadema, who had been at the helm for 38 years.

    Al Jazeera's Charlotte Bellis reports.


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