The Indonesian tribe that rejects technology

The Baduy practice seclusion to protect their ancient traditions, but things are changing.

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    The Baduy tribe from Banten in Indonesia practise seclusion and reject all modern technology to protect their ancient traditions. For centuries, their way of life hasn't changed. Electricity is outlawed, along with modern modes of communication and formal education. Power lines stop at the border of their lands, but in recent years, the outside world has begun to creep in.

    The tribe has split in two - the more strict inner circle remain "pure", while the outer circle have relaxed some rules. Some have started using mobile phones and solar-powered lanterns. Will adopting some aspects of modern technology help the Baduy survive the modern world, or will it destroy their ancient traditions?

    Filmed by Al Jazeera's Hassan Ghani.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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