The Indonesian tribe that rejects technology

The Baduy practice seclusion to protect their ancient traditions, but things are changing.

by

    The Baduy tribe from Banten in Indonesia practise seclusion and reject all modern technology to protect their ancient traditions. For centuries, their way of life hasn't changed. Electricity is prohibited, along with modern modes of communication and formal education. Power lines stop at the border of their lands, but in recent years, the outside world has begun to creep in.

    The tribe has split in two - the more strict inner circle remain "pure", while the outer circle have relaxed some rules. Some have started using mobile phones and solar-powered lanterns. Will adopting some aspects of modern technology help the Baduy survive the modern world, or will it destroy their ancient traditions?

    Filmmaker: Hassan Ghani

    Assistant Producer: Surya Fachrizal

    Translation: Nurfitri Taher

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    ABOUT THE AUTHOR



    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    How different voting systems work around the world

    How different voting systems work around the world

    Nearly two billion voters in 52 countries around the world will head to the polls this year to elect their leaders.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    The peace games: Dreaming big for South Sudan's youth

    The peace games: Dreaming big for South Sudan's youth

    A relatively new independence and fresh waves of conflict inspire a South Sudanese refugee to build antiwar video games.