[QODLink]
Asia-pacific

Chinese battle to make land fertile again

As pollution takes its toll on the environment, Beijing is now supporting numerous projects to find solutions.

Last updated: 19 Apr 2014 09:43
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

People in China are increasingly having to deal with the environmental cost of their rapid economic growth.

A government report says nearly one-fifth of farmland in mainland China is polluted. The report was based on a study undertaken from April 2005 to last December on more than 2.4 million square miles of land across the country.

The study says 16.1 percent of China's soil and 19.4 percent of its arable land is contaminated. It says heavy metals cadmium, nickel and arsenic are the top pollutants.

The report blames industrial and agricultural activities - things like factory waste, the improper use of fertilizers and pesticides, and irrigating land with polluted water.

Hunan Province, in central China, has some of the worst soil pollution and is also one of the country's top metal producers.

It is also a large rice-growing area, and produced 16 percent of the country's crop in 2012.

As pollution in the air, water and land takes its toll, the government is now supporting numerous projects to find solutions.

Al Jazeera's Rob McBride reports from Zhejian Province, in eastern China, about a scientist looking to make the land fertile once more.

187

Source:
Al Jazeera
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
More than one-quarter of Gaza's population has been displaced, causing a humanitarian crisis.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Muslim charities claim discrimination after major UK banks began closing their accounts.
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Featured
A humanitarian crisis and a budget crisis converge in the heart of the human smuggling corridor in Texas.
Indonesian and Malaysian authorities are keeping a close eye on local supporters of the hard-line Middle East group.
Citizens of the tiny African nation say they're increasingly anxious of the fallout after alleged coup.
Assam officials upset that WWII-era Stillwell Road won't be used in transnational highway linking four Asian nations.
Informal health centres are treating thousands of Syrian refugees in Turkey, easing the pressure on local hospitals.
join our mailing list