[QODLink]
Americas

Ecuador president: Snowden out of our hands

Rafael Correa tells Al Jazeera US security whistleblower has to be in Ecuador or approach an embassy to secure asylum.

Last Modified: 01 Jul 2013 13:36
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

Rafael Correa, Ecuador's president, has said his country will take a "sovereign decision" to consider US intelligence whistleblower Edward Snowden's request for asylum, but added that his fate is not in the hands of Ecuadorians.

Speaking to Al Jazeera, Correa said Ecuador could not take any steps because Snowden was not on Ecuadorian soil and had not approached an Ecuadorian embassy.

The former National Security Agency freelance analyst is believed to be in Moscow's international airport and is wanted by the US for leaking confidential information about a surveillance programme called PRISM.

Snowden, who travelled to Moscow from Hong Kong, has since had his passport revoked by the US government.

Correa added that the Ecuadorian ambassador in Russia had met Snowden but there had been no further contact with him.

Asked about the treatment of asylum given to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, Correa said that the difference with Assange was that he made it to the Ecuadorian embassy.

Correa said that any decision to be made with respect to Snowden would be based on US and international laws.

He said that Snowden had been seeking asylum in countries such as Russia, China and Ecuador, which contradicts certain US senators' views that these countries restricts and monitors freedom of expression.

"Rest assured, we don't spy on anyone, unless it is organised crime," Correa said. "We don't accept anybody doing it."

Watch the full interview with Correa on Talk to Al Jazeera.

241

Source:
Al Jazeera
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
Absenteeism among doctors at government hospitals is rife, prompting innovative efforts to ensure they turn up for work.
Marginalised and jobless, desperate young men in Nairobi slums provide fertile ground for al-Shabab.
The Khmer Rouge tribunal is set to hear genocide charges for targeting ethnic Vietnamese and Cham Muslims.
'I'm dying anyway, one piece at a time' said Steve Fobister, who suffers from disabilities caused by mercury poisoning.
The world's newest professional sport comes from an unlikely source: video games.
join our mailing list