[QODLink]
Americas

Ecuador president: Snowden out of our hands

Rafael Correa tells Al Jazeera US security whistleblower has to be in Ecuador or approach an embassy to secure asylum.

Last Modified: 01 Jul 2013 13:36
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

Rafael Correa, Ecuador's president, has said his country will take a "sovereign decision" to consider US intelligence whistleblower Edward Snowden's request for asylum, but added that his fate is not in the hands of Ecuadorians.

Speaking to Al Jazeera, Correa said Ecuador could not take any steps because Snowden was not on Ecuadorian soil and had not approached an Ecuadorian embassy.

The former National Security Agency freelance analyst is believed to be in Moscow's international airport and is wanted by the US for leaking confidential information about a surveillance programme called PRISM.

Snowden, who travelled to Moscow from Hong Kong, has since had his passport revoked by the US government.

Correa added that the Ecuadorian ambassador in Russia had met Snowden but there had been no further contact with him.

Asked about the treatment of asylum given to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, Correa said that the difference with Assange was that he made it to the Ecuadorian embassy.

Correa said that any decision to be made with respect to Snowden would be based on US and international laws.

He said that Snowden had been seeking asylum in countries such as Russia, China and Ecuador, which contradicts certain US senators' views that these countries restricts and monitors freedom of expression.

"Rest assured, we don't spy on anyone, unless it is organised crime," Correa said. "We don't accept anybody doing it."

Watch the full interview with Correa on Talk to Al Jazeera.

241

Source:
Al Jazeera
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
Remnants of deadly demonstrations to be displayed in a new museum, a year after protests pushed president out of power.
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.