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Tokyo governor issues 'sincere apology'

Up against Istanbul and Madrid for the 2020 Olympics, Tokyo governor is in hot water after unsavoury comments.

Last Modified: 30 Apr 2013 13:23
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Naoki Inose (C) apologises after breaking IOC protocol by criticising opponent as quoted in New York Times [AP]

Tokyo governor Naoki Inose offered a 'sincere apology' on Tuesday for criticising rival candidate Istanbul in violation of IOC rules on the bidding for the 2020 Olympics.

Inose, also chairman of the Tokyo bid committee, was quoted in the New York Times last weekend suggesting Istanbul was less developed and less equipped to host the games than the Japanese capital.

The governor said on Tuesday the article focused on a 'small number of comments' relating to another bid city and did not reflect his 'sincere and wider thoughts' on the campaign.

"I regrettably acknowledge, however, that some of my words might be considered inappropriate and consequently would like to offer my sincere apology,'' Inose said.

"Although his sincere thoughts differ from the content of the story published, he acknowledges that his comments related to another bid city and religion may have conflicted with the IOC guidelines"

Tokyo bid leader Tsunekazu Takeda

In the interview conducted in New York, Inose said: "For the athletes, where will be the best place to be? Well, compare the two countries where they have yet to build infrastructure, very sophisticated facilities."

He was also quoted as saying, "Islamic countries, the only thing they share in common is Allah and they are fighting with each other, and they have classes."

International Olympic Committee rules prohibiting bid cities from commenting on rival candidates. The remarks could lead to a reprimand or warning from the IOC ethics commission.

Madrid is the third city bidding for the 2020 Games. The IOC will select the host city on Sept. 7 in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Turkish Youth and Sports Minister Suat Kilic called Inose's comments 'unfair and saddening.'

"These remarks are not in accordance with the Olympic spirit,'' Kilic said in comments posted on Twitter on Saturday and confirmed by the sports ministry on Tuesday.

"Istanbul is a candidate city for 2020, but we haven't made any impairing comments about any other candidate city until now, and we won't.

"We like the Japanese people. We respect their culture, their elders and their youth. If the subject is Istanbul then there is no need to talk much."

Respect IOC rules

Inose said he is 'fully committed' to abiding by the IOC rules and looks forward to a 'respectful and friendly rivalry with the other bid cities.'

Japanese Olympic Committee president and Tokyo bid leader Tsunekazu Takeda received an email from the IOC seeking confirmation of the facts of the matter, Kyodo News agency reported on Tuesday.

Takeda insisted Inose was fully aware of the IOC rules.

"Although his sincere thoughts differ from the content of the story published, he acknowledges that his comments related to another bid city and religion may have conflicted with the IOC guidelines and, as a result, offered his profound apologies,'' Takeda said in a statement.

"We promise to reaffirm our utmost respect for the IOC guidelines," Takeda said.

"We will continue to respect the IOC rules and give our all during the remainder of the bidding process."

Tokyo, who hosted the 1964 Olympics, is bidding for a second straight time after a failed attempt for the 2016 Games, which went to Rio de Janeiro. 

Istanbul are bidding for a fifth time for their first games.

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