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McCullum helps draw Hyderabad Test
Second Test between India and New Zealand ends in tame draw after Brendon McCullum hits career best 225.
Last Modified: 16 Nov 2010 13:40 GMT
Brendon McCullum, right, frustrated Indian spinners with his quick footwork and deft reverse sweeps [Reuters]

A career best 225 from Brendon McCullum has helped New Zealand draw the second Test against India in Hyderabad.

During his nine-hour innings, McCullum hit 22 fours and four sixes, giving his side a tea time score of 448 for eight.

The Kiwis, ranked eighth in the world, set the hosts an improbable target of 327 runs in the last session on Tuesday to win the Test.

Kane Williamson also impressed against the number one side, partnering McCullum for 124 runs and making 69 with nine fours.

"It was quite important for us to bat some time and score some runs, else we were in danger of losing the Test," McCullum told Neo Cricket channel.

"So far it's been thoroughly enjoyable and a different challenge. When you are a strokemaker you always want to find the right tempo. Sometimes you are guilty of being over aggressive."

India reached 68-0 in its second innings with Virender Sehwag on 54 and Gautam Gambhir on 14 when stumps were called.

The three match series is tied at 0-0, with the concluding test to come in Nagpur on November 20 to 24.

After the final Test, the teams will play a five-match limited-overs series.

Source:
Agencies
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