[QODLink]
The Cure

Unsung Hero: Henry Molaison

How one man's brain surgery shaped our understanding of memory function.

Last Modified: 28 Aug 2013 08:40
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
[Image of Henry Molaison, copyright Suzanne Corkin]

Henry Molaison was an American memory disorder patient who, in 1953, at the age of 27, had parts of his brain removed in an attempt to cure his epilepsy.

While the removal of parts of his hippocampus, amygdaloid complex and entorhinal cortex reduced seizures, Henry lost the ability to form any new memories and lived the rest of his life in the present tense.

He was not able to create any new long-term memories, such as learning new words or recalling times and dates, although he was able to recall long-term memories from before his surgery and learn some new tasks such as walking with a frame.

By agreeing to be studied until his death, Molaison enabled researchers to far better understand how different areas of the brain are linked to specific memory function.

 

Watch The Cure on Tuesday: 2230; Wednesday: 0930; Thursday: 0330; Friday: 1630; Saturday: 2230; Sunday: 0930; Monday: 0330; Tuesday: 1630 GMT. 

Join the conversation on Facebook and on Twitter

207

Source:
Al Jazeera
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Featured on Al Jazeera
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Colleagues of detained Al Jazeera journalists press demands for their release, 100 days after their arrest in Egypt.
Mehdi Hasan discusses online freedoms and the potential of the web with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.
A tight race seems likely as 814 million voters elect leaders in world's largest democracy next week.
Featured
Activists say 'Honor Diaries' documentary exploits gender-based violence to further an anti-Islamic agenda.
As Syria's civil war escalates along the Turkish border, many in Turkey are questioning the country's involvement.
Treatment for autism in the region has progressed, but lack of awareness and support services remains a challenge.
The past isn't far away for a people exiled from Crimea by Russia and the decades it took to get home.
New report highlights plight of domestic helpers in the United Kingdom, with critics comparing it to kefala system.
join our mailing list