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One state, two states or even three states?

From Ramallah, we ask if Palestinians can overcome their divisions and bring more than 60 years of occupation to an end.
Last Modified: 17 Jan 2013 12:06

Palestinians have lived under occupation for more than 60 years. Their homes and land have been stolen and their status reduced to that of refugees in their own country.

But instead of uniting against a common enemy, Palestinians are divided, between the Islamists in Hamas who rule Gaza, and the Palestinian Authority (PA) that governs the West Bank.

Many accuse the PA of being Israeli stooges and their mismanagement of everything from unemployment, sky-rocketing prices, water rights, taxation and border issues have made them deeply unpopular. Postponing elections simply prolongs the crisis.

The paradox is that Ramallah, the unofficial capital of the occupied territories, is booming, with aid money pouring in to assuage the world's guilty consciences.

Many worry that this is breeding an aid-dependent culture and further weakening Palestinian resistance.

And what hope is there of any permanent solution? Will the Palestinians continue to live in limbo, in one state, two states, or even three states?

 

 

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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