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Bulletproof classroom

Using technology developed for the battlefield, bulletproof backpacks and whiteboards make their way into classrooms.

Last updated: 13 May 2014 08:24
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In this week's episde of TechKnow, we examine ballistic backpacks and bulletproof whiteboards made for use in classrooms to protect students and teachers from school shootings. Contributor and former CIA operations officer Lindsay Moran tests the equipment and speaks with parents about their thoughts on the technology.

Some parents say any extra security is a good thing - though others worry that bulletproof backpacks could give students a false sense of safety. Still others say that added security measures could have negative psychological effects on students.

Also on the show, Kyle Hill takes us to Indiana, where a major dairy farm has come up with a creative way to dispose of the five million gallons of manure its cows produce every day. The manure is converted into clean-burning natural gas, which is then used to fuel the trucks that deliver the cows' milk. Climate change is forcing almost every major industry to adapt - and with 20 percent of greenhouse gas emissions coming from farms, the agricultural sector will play an important role.


TechKnow can be seen each week at the following times GMT: Monday: 2230; Tuesday: 0930; Wednesday: 0330; Thursday: 1630.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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