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Riz Khan
Geneva talks: a step forward?
Iran is discussing its nuclear programme with world powers after announcing progress in its ability to enrich uranium.
Last Modified: 07 Dec 2010 11:15 GMT

Iran and major world powers will resume talks in Geneva this week, a year after the previous negotiations over Tehran's nuclear programme failed. Amid low expectations, what can be accomplished?

The meeting will focus on Iran's uranium enrichment. That takes on added significance after Tehran announced it had, for the first time, domestically produced raw uranium, also known as "yellow cake". The West fears Iran is secretly making a nuclear bomb, but Tehran insists its programme is peaceful.

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Tensions have also increased over the recent attacks on two Iranian nuclear scientists which killed one of them. Tehran says the UN Security Council is to blame for publishing the names of the men in its sanctions resolutions.

On Monday's Riz Khan, we ask: In such an atmosphere of animosity, can the talks in Geneva achieve anything?

We will be joined by John Limbert, the former US deputy assistant secretary of state for Iran; Foad Izadi, a professor of political communications at Tehran University; and Olli Heinonen, the former deputy director of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

This episode of Riz Khan aired from Monday, December 6, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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