[QODLink]
People & Power
America's Dangerous Game
This film examines the covert war in Yemen and asks if the US is creating more enemies than it can capture or kill.
Last Modified: 08 Mar 2012 07:22

Last year, the Obama administration celebrated the killing of Anwar al-Awlaki, a leading figure in al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), as the latest military victory in its new counter-terrorism strategy focused on covert kill/capture operations.
 
In the US, the al-Awlaki strike looked like a clear tactical victory against AQAP, which Washington now considers its most dangerous enemy in the 'war on terror'.

But from a Yemeni perspective, the US' covert military campaign seems to be undermining its own strategic interests.

Critics say that even when they hit their intended targets, US missile strikes and raids just further destabilise the country.

And the American need for proxy forces and intelligence tied the US into a dangerous and compromising alliance with Yemen's embattled and unpopular president, Ali Abdullah Saleh. Now he has been forced out by protests against his authoritarian regime, the White House's efforts may come to naught.
 
America's Dangerous Game, from filmmakers Richard Rowley and Jeremy Scahill, reveals the full scale of the covert war in Yemen and asks the question: Is the US creating more enemies than it can kill or capture?

 
People & Power airs each week at the following times GMT: Wednesday: 2230; Thursday: 0930; Friday: 0330; Saturday: 1630; Sunday: 2230; Monday: 0930; Tuesday: 0330; Wednesday: 1630.

Click here for more People & Power.
Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Featured
The organisation is struggling to its relevance without Julian Assange at the helm.
After decades of overfishing, Japan is taking aim at increasing the number of bluefin tuna in the ocean.
Chinese scientists are designing a particle-smashing collider so massive it could encircle a city.
Critics say the government is going full-steam ahead on economic recovery at the expense of human rights.
Spirits are high in Scotland's 'Whisky Capital of the World' with one distillery thirsty for independence.
join our mailing list