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One on One
Suad Amiry
The author, architect, and peace delegate reflects on her experiences in the West Bank.
Last Modified: 07 Aug 2010 12:18 GMT



Born in Damascus and raised as a refugee in Jordan, Suad Amiry reflects on her life experiences in the West Bank and the inspiration behind her diverse career.

She grew up in a traditional family with strong values and a positive outlook, which empowered her to lead a successful career across many fields – including as a peace delegate to the US.

Having studied architecture, she founded the Riwaq Centre for Architechtural Conservation in Palestine in 1991 where she currently serves as director.

Since then she has also remained active in Birzeit University and has written two popular novels: Sharon and My Mother-in-Law (2004) and Nothing to Lose But Your Life (2010).

She says: "My books are really about everyday life … about people who want to live."

This episode of One on One can be seen from Saturday, August 7, at the following times GMT: Saturday: 0030, 1630; Sunday: 0430, 2330; Monday: 0300, 1230.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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