The fallout from the attack on a French magazine which published cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad has spread to Yemen, with further implications for France, the US and Britain.

An offshoot of al-Qaeda in Yemen says it was behind the shooting of 12 people at the Paris offices of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

According to US intelligence, at least one of the brothers involved in the attack trained or even fought in Yemen. A third suspect is said to have claimed allegiance to the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) group.

French elite forces shot dead all three men on Friday in separate sieges, in which four hostages were killed.

A member of al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) said France was targeted for its "obvious role in the war on Islam".

And he warned of continuing the group's policy of "hitting the snake's head … until the West retreats".

The developments are focusing renewed attention on security and reigniting concerns that nationals are being radicalised by foreign influences to target their home countries.

Presenter

Hazem Sika

Guests

Anne Guidicelli - founder of Terrorisc, a consultancy firm on security risk.

Abdul-Ghani al-Iryani - President of the Democratic Awakening Movement in Yemen.

Shashank Joshi - senior research fellow at the Royal United Services Institute.

Live Box 201493123623889276

Source: Al Jazeera