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Libya: Who will win the power struggle?

Scores of people have been killed in Libya as violence ramps up.

Last updated: 29 Jul 2014 08:57
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There is growing concern about Libya's difficult transition as this country is now polarised between the two main factions of competing militia brigades and their political allies.

Special envoys for Libya from the Arab League, the United States and European countries have expressed their concerns about the situation in Libya, saying it had reached a "critical stage" and called for an immediate ceasefire.
 
The situation on the ground is made worse by a shaky political situation, particularly after the general elections held in June. The successive governments that have been in place since the toppling of Muammar Gaddafi have all failed to put in place the necessary institutions to govern Libya.
 
But are Libyans themselves responsible for the ongoing turmoil? Or has the international community failed to support their nation building?
 
Presenter: Mike Hanna
 
Guests
 
Jason Pack, the president of Libya-analysis.com and a researcher on Libyan history.
 
Karim Merzan, a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council's Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East.
 
Richard Northern, a former British Ambassador to Libya.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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