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Inside Story

Thailand: Can army chief restore stability?

On Inside Story we ask can the army act as mediator to the country's polarised political rivals

Last updated: 23 May 2014 20:19
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Thailand's army has deposed the elected government and seized power.
 
Ousted Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra was summoned for talks with the new military leader - and she is also among 150 people banned from leaving the country.
 
The camps of both pro- and anti- government groups have been dismantled and protesters ordered to return home- and a curfew is in place.

All eyes are on the military chief - and whether he will be able to restore stability in Thailand.

With several Western powers condemning the coup, does General Prayuth Chan-ocha have his work cut out for him? 

Presenter:  Mike Hannah 

Guests: 

Sean Boonpracong: He is an adviser to the prime minister's office and a former national security adviser.

Tim Forsyth: A professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Benjamin Zawacki:  an independent Southeast Asia Analyst.

 

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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