[QODLink]
Inside Story

Is peace with the Taliban possible?

Little progress has been achieved as Pakistan and Afghanistan seek peace with the religious group.

Last updated: 06 May 2014 20:01
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif says he is still hopeful that talks with the Pakistani Taliban will be successful, despite the militant group ending its call for a ceasefire. Sharif says the group has to lay down its arms and respect the Constitution.

Meanwhile. the Pakistani Taliban has made it clear it does not accept the Pakistani Constitution and says it is committed to enforcing its brand of Sharia law across the country. Since the group began its campaign of violence in 2007, thousands of people have been killed in bomb and gun attacks.

In neighbouring Afghanistan, peace talks between the government and the Taliban to be held in Qatar were announced in June only to be canceled following a dispute over the Taliban displaying its banner and flag at its Doha office.

Two brothers of leading Taliban negotiator, Tayyeb Agha, have allegedly been picked in Pakistan, making peace talks even more complicated. Agha is said to be close to Mullah Omar, the Taliban's spiritual leader.

So, can Pakistan and Afghanistan make long lasting peace with the  Taliban?

Presenter: Mike Hanna
 
Guests:
 
Mohammad Ismail Qasemyar, the International Advisor for the state-backed Afghan High Peace Council.
 
Ayaz Wazir, former member of the first Pak-Afghan Loya Jirga.
 
Ayesha Siddiqa, independent social scientist and author of several books including "Military Inc".

296

Source:
Al Jazeera
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Private citizens take initiative to help 'irregular' migrants, accusing governments of excessive focus on security.
Indonesia's cassava plantations are being killed by mealybugs, and thousands of wasps will be released to stop them.
Violence in Ain al-Arab has prompted many Kurdish Syrians to flee to Turkey, but others are returning to battle ISIL.
Unelected representatives quietly iron out logistics of massive TPP and TTIP deals among US, Europe, and Asia-Pacific.
Led by students concerned for their future with 'nothing to lose', it remains to be seen who will blink first.
join our mailing list