[QODLink]
Inside Story

Iraq Election: Will there be change?

Iraqis are hoping for stability and peace after years of violence.  

Last updated: 01 May 2014 19:10
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

Voters in Iraq have gone to the polls for the first parliamentary election since US troops left three years ago.
 
The government put in place unprecedented levels of security across the country, particularly in the capital Baghdad. And the vote was largely free of violence.
 
Prime Minister Nouri al Maliki says he is 'certain' of victory as he vies for a third term in office. But his critics say his Shia-dominated government favours a sectarian agenda.
 
Regardless of the outcome, Maliki is expected to play a critical role in building a coalition after the election.
 
So can this vote restore stability and the peace many Iraqis seek?
 
Presenter: Mike Hanna
 
Guests:

Alaa Makki - Member of the Iraqi Parliament and one of the candidates for the Wataniya Alliance.
 
Mark Kimmitt - Retired Brigadier General for the U.S. Army, who served as the Deputy Director of Operations for Coalition Forces in Iraq.
 
Ghassan Al Attiyah - Director for the Iraqi Institute for Democracy and Development.

168

Source:
Al Jazeera
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Featured on Al Jazeera
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Featured
Referendum on Scottish independence is the first major election in the UK where 16 and 17-year olds get a vote.
Blogger critical of a lack of government transparency faces defamation lawsuit from Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong.
Farmers worry about their future as buyers shun local produce and rivers show an elevated presence of heavy metals.
War-torn neighbour is an uncertain haven for refugees fleeing Pakistan's Balochistan, where locals seek independence.
NSA whistleblower Snowden and journalist Greenwald accuse Wellington of mass spying on New Zealanders.
join our mailing list