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Climate change: Can disaster be avoided?

Yet another UN report on climate change warns of dire consequences if no action is taken.

Last updated: 13 Apr 2014 19:02
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The IPCC, or the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, released its third report on Sunday that painted a grim picture.

The report, produced by 1250 international experts and approved by 194 governments, dismisses fears that slashing carbon emissions would wreck the world economy.

It warns that failure to properly address this problem poses a grave threat to people and could lead to wars and mass migration. However, the report says a climate change catastrophe can be averted without sacrificing living standards.

There are recommendations on how to deal with this worsening situation. And the report urges governments to take action before it's too late.

But, why so many reports and meetings if climate change is only getting worse?

Presenter: Kamahl Santamaria

Guests:

Karen Seto, coordinating lead author of UN's report on climate change and global warming. Karen specialises on urbanisation and environmental change.

Bob Ward, policy and communications director of Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, at the London School of Economics.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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