[QODLink]
Inside Story
Russia's winds of change
With widespread corruption among officials and a growing wealth gap, we ask if Russians are tired of Putin's leadership.
Last Modified: 05 Dec 2011 11:09

In what was seen as the biggest threat to the 11-year rule of Vladimir Putin, Russia's prime minister, millions of Russians went to vote in the country's parliamentary elections on Sunday.

The vote, which was overshadowed by opposition allegations of voting irregularities, was considered a crucial test for Putin, who is seeking to return to the presidency in elections in March.

But despite the marginalisation of opposition groups, Putin and his United Russia party are expected to lose their two-thirds majority in parliament. Only seven parties were allowed to field candidates this year, and the loudest opposition groups had been silenced.
 
Will Russia's strongman maintain his influence in the Duma as he seeks to become president for a third time? Or are Russians getting tired of Putin's leadership, given the widespread corruption among officials and a growing gap between the rich and poor?
 
Inside Story, with presenter Stephen Cole, discusses with guests: Alexander Nekrassov, a former Kremlin adviser and author; Masha Lipman, a political analyst at the Carnegie Moscow Centre; and Ivan Safranchuk, the deputy director of the Institute of Contemporary International Studies in Moscow.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.