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Inside Story
Syria: The Arab League's next move
As Syria's government ignores the Arab League peace plan, we ask if it is time for international military intervention.
Last Modified: 08 Nov 2011 10:43

What is usually a joyous time descended into violence and death as the first day of Eid was celebrated in Syria. At least 16 people were killed in the western city of Homs - a hotbed of anti-government protests since the uprising began in March.

The crackdown came as Qatar's foreign minister called for Arab states to meet next Saturday to discuss Syria's failure to meet obligations outlined in an Arab action plan to end the crisis.

The Arab League had warned that failing to respond to the Arab solution would lead to catastrophic results in Syria and the entire region.

What could be the Arab League's next move? And is an international military intervention now an option?

Inside Story, with presenter Adrian Finnigan, discusses with guests: Louay Safi, a member of the Syrian National Council; Abdullah Alashaal, a professor of international law and politics at the American University in Cairo; and Bassam Abu Abdullah, a professor of international relations at Damascus University.

"The Arab League is going to split over the Syrian issue, despite the fact that all the Arab League members are now united for one point: To save the blood of the Syrian people and to get some sort of settlement in Syria with the regime, not outside the regime. If you overpass the regime, if you take another pressure step like kicking out or even expelling Syria from the Arab League, this will be very dangerous. But if it is needed by the people of Syria, we need to consider it."

Abdullah Alashaal, a professor at the American University in Cairo

Source:
Al Jazeera
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