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Inside Story
Egyptian military's quandary
Losing popular support, or giving in to the demands of the revolution and losing their empire?
Last Modified: 23 Nov 2011 10:04

Egyptian activists continue to put pressure on the military to give up power.

Hundreds of thousands of people have been flocking to Cairo's Tahrir Square over the last three days, resulting in clashes that have killed dozens of people and left hundreds of others injured.

Demonstrators fear that the military intends to hold on to power, whatever the outcome of any elections.

They are calling on Egypt's military leadership - the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, better known as SCAF - to hand over power.

As protestors demand the end of Egypt's military-led rule, we ask: Where does the army get its power from? And as the revolution gathers steam, what is the military likely to do next?

Inside Story discusses with guests: Mona Makram-Ebeid, a member of the Social Democratic Party; Ahmed Salah, a political activist; and Talaat Mosallam, a retired major-general in the Egyptian army.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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