[QODLink]
Inside Story
'Occupy': A catalyst for change?
As anti-greed protests spread to cities across the world, Inside Story examines the movement's goals and its impact.
Last Modified: 16 Oct 2011 10:05

The 'Occupy' movement is holding gatherings around the world as protesters meet in the financial centres of several cities. The movement's central site, United for Global Change, says 951 cities in 82 countries will participate in rallies.

Dozens of protesters were arrested in New York as thousands marched through the city's financial district before moving on to Times Square. Protests were also held elsewhere in the US and Canada, notably in Washington DC, the US capital.

And several cities across the world - from Tokyo to Alaska via London, Frankfurt and Washington - held demonstrations in a show of solidarity with the rallies that began last month in New York.
 
But does the movement have a defined agenda? Could it be a catalyst for change? And at what price?
 
Inside Story, with presenter Mike Hanna, discusses with Mark Bray, an organiser and media team member of 'Occupy Wall Street'; Alessio Rastani, an independent stock broker; and Dean Baker, the co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy research.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
More than one-quarter of Gaza's population has been displaced, causing a humanitarian crisis.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Muslim charities claim discrimination after major UK banks began closing their accounts.
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Featured
In Brussels, NGO staff are being trained to fill the shortfall of field workers in West Africa.
Lawsuit by 6-year-old girl, locked up for a year, reignites debate over indefinite detention of 'boat people'.
Indonesian and Malaysian authorities are keeping a close eye on local supporters of the hard-line Middle East group.
Citizens of the tiny African nation say they're increasingly anxious of the fallout after alleged coup.
A humanitarian crisis and a budget crisis converge in the heart of the human smuggling corridor in Texas.
join our mailing list