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Inside Story
Is Mexico losing the war on drugs?
What will it take to root out drug violence in Mexico?
Last Modified: 02 Sep 2011 10:25

There is growing skepticism over the drug plan by Felipe Calderon, the Mexican president, after a deadly attack in the north of the country last week. The brazen attack was the worst on civilians since the massacre of 72 migrants last year. The president blamed the drug cartels for the killings.

As the violence becomes more brutal, Calderon appears to be losing his war on drugs. He first ordered a crackdown against the cartels when he took office in late 2006. However, turf wars between rival drug gangs have since killed about 42,000 people.

Just what will it take to root out this violence? Is drug legalisation the answer? And what role would the US play in Mexico's drugs war?

Inside Story, with presenter Jane Dutton, discusses with guests: Andres Lajou, a political activist and editor of Nexos Magazine; Bill Piper, the National Affairs director at the Drug Policy Alliance; and Paul McGrath, the director of Violent Risk Forecasting at Exclusive Analysis.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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