[QODLink]
Inside Story
Rethinking US policy on Afghanistan
Where do the protests over Quran-burning leave US policy in Afghanistan?
Last Modified: 05 Apr 2011 14:26

It began with the burning of the Quran by an American pastor. Barack Obama, the US president, called it an act of extreme intolerance and bigotry, but he also criticised the violent protests in Afghanistan that were sparked by the incident.

Anger spread to the main southern Afghan city of Kandahar, the spiritual heartland of the Taliban. Protests took place a day after seven UN staff were among 14 people killed in the northern city of Mazar-e-Sharif.

They overwhelmed guards at the UN compound before setting it ablaze. It was the worst attack on the world body since the 2001 US-led invasion. 

Last year Pastor Terry Jones drew condemnation over his aborted plan to burn copies of the Quran on the anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks. A top UN official blames the pastor for the violence now erupting in Afghanistan.

So where does this leave the US-led effort to bring stability to the country?

Inside Story, with presenter Hazem Sika, discusses with guests: Prince Ali Seraj, the president of the National Coalition for Dialogue with the tribes of Afghanistan; Phil Rees, a journalist and author of Dining with Terrorists; and Doug Bandow, a senior fellow at the Cato Institute, specialising in foreign policy and civil liberties.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Sunday, April 3, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Mother of jailed Al Jazeera journalist Abdullah Elshamy says her son's ordeal highlights the value of press freedom.
French Jews and Muslims say recent National Front victories in mayoral races reflect rising xenophobia.
Western fighters have streamed into the Middle East to help 'liberate' Arab countries such as Syria and Libya.
The Pakistani government is proposing reform of the nation's madrassas, which are accused of fostering terrorism.
Featured
Survivors of Bangladesh garment factory collapse say they received little compensation and face economic hardship.
As Iraq prepares to vote, deadly violence is surging. But at the site of one bomb attack, people insist life must go on.
French Jews and Muslims say recent National Front victories in mayoral races reflect rising xenophobia.
Up to 23,000 federal prisoners could qualify for clemency under new Justice Department initiative.
After years of rapid growth, Argentina is bracing for another economic crisis as inflation eats up purchasing power.
join our mailing list