[QODLink]
Inside Story
Losing the information war
Is the US really losing the information war, as Hillary Clinton claims, and how can it fight back?
Last Modified: 06 Mar 2011 09:55 GMT

"America is facing an information war ... and we are losing that war." That is what Hillary Clinton, the US secretary of state, said as she spoke before the Senate foreign relations committee.

The war, she says, is being won by networks that offer "real news". She praised Al Jazeera and said that it is changing peoples' minds and attitudes.

Her comments came as Republicans plan to cut the state department's budget by half.

Is the US really losing the information war? And is public funding the solution?

Inside Story presenter Sami Zeidan discusses with guests: Tom Fenton, a former foreign correspondent and author of Bad News: The Decline of Reporting, the Business of News, and the Danger to Us All; Charlie Wolf, a political commentator and broadcaster; and Abdallah Schliefer, the former NBC Cairo bureau chief and now professor emeritus of journalism at the American University of Cairo.

This episode of Inside Story aired from March 5, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
Absenteeism among doctors at government hospitals is rife, prompting innovative efforts to ensure they turn up for work.
Marginalised and jobless, desperate young men in Nairobi slums provide fertile ground for al-Shabab.
The Khmer Rouge tribunal is set to hear genocide charges for targeting ethnic Vietnamese and Cham Muslims.
'I'm dying anyway, one piece at a time' said Steve Fobister, who suffers from disabilities caused by mercury poisoning.
The world's newest professional sport comes from an unlikely source: video games.
join our mailing list