[QODLink]
Inside Story
How did Egypt become so corrupt?
A picture is emerging of a state where wealth fuels political power and political power buys wealth.
Last Modified: 08 Feb 2011 15:12 GMT

It has been nearly two weeks and the protesters in Egypt are still calling for the president to leave. 

Many Egyptians feel that the only ones benefitting from the country's wealth are businessmen with ties to the ruling National Democratic Party.

Reports about the wealth of Hosni Mubarak, his family and the people close to him have started to emerge. According to some reports, Mubarak himself has an estimated net worth of $40bn to $70bn.

They paint a picture of a state where wealth fuels political power and political power buys wealth. 
 
How did Egypt become so corrupt? And what can a new government really do about it?

Joining us to discuss these issues are: Arwa Hassan, a senior programme coordinator at Transparency International; Ibrahim Khayat, an economist and business analyst; and Husam Abdullah, a UK-based Egyptian activist and a member of the Egyptian Association for Change.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Monday, February 7, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
The world's newest professional sport comes from an unlikely source: video games.
The group's takeover of farms in Qaraqosh, 30km from Mosul, has caused fear among residents, and a jump in food prices.
Protests and online activism in recent months have brought a resurgence of ethnic Oromo nationalism in Ethiopia.
Chemotherapy is big business, but some US doctors say it could be overused and are pushing for cheaper and better care.
Amid vote audit and horse-trading, politicians of all hues agree a compromise is needed to avoid political instability.
join our mailing list