[QODLink]
Inside Story
The tool for revolution?
We discuss if social media can really be credited with sparking the recent uprisings across the Middle East.
Last Modified: 10 Feb 2011 12:23 GMT

While the Egyptian government's alleged response to the unrest appears to be shutting down or limiting access to social networking sites, mobile phones and the Internet across the country, users are reportedly finding other alternatives to stay connected.

Social media has been dubbed the new tool for revolutionaries.

The seeds were sown in 2009 when Twitter was credited with the protests following the Iranian elections.

Debate followed the Tunisian uprising that saw the ousting of Zine el-Abidin Ben Ali earlier this year as to whether it was the first Twitter revolution.
 
And now in Egypt, the role of social media in mobilising the people has once again come into focus.

But with many of the protesters on the ground having little or no access to the internet in Egypt, can social media really be credited with what is happening across the Middle East?

Joining us to discuss these issues are: Courtney Radsch, a senior programme officer managing the Global Freedom of Expression campaign for Freedom House; Mohammad al-Abdallah, the programme officer at the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ); Jillian York, the project coordinator at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University; and Omar Offendum, an Arab-American hip-hop artist.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Wednesday, February 9, 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.
Public stripping and assault of woman and rival protests thereafter highlight Kenya's gender-relations divide.