[QODLink]
Inside Story
Disaster strikes Indonesia
As the death toll from the tsunami continues to rise, we ask why the early warning system failed to work.
Last Modified: 31 Oct 2010 07:55 GMT

Indonesia has been hit by yet another tsunami - washing away at least 20 villages and leaving hundreds dead and many more missing.

And all this despite an expensive Tsunami early-warning system. As the waves surged towards the coastline, the system failed to work and no warning was given.

Indonesia's disaster response agency says the system had been vandalised and was not properly maintained.

As the death toll continues to rise, we ask why the system did not work.

Inside Story, with presenter Darren Jordon, discusses with guests: Amelia Merrick, the national director for World Vision Indonesia; Flemming Konradsen, the deputy head of studies in disaster management at the University of Copenhagen; and Tristan Robinson, a lecturer in environmental engineering at University College London.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Thursday, October 28, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Despite 14-year struggle for a new mosque in the second-largest city, new roadblocks are erected at every turn.
Authorities and demonstrators have shown no inclination to yield despite growing economic damage and protest pressure.
Lebanese-born Rula Ghani may take cues from the modernising Queen Soraya, but she'll have to proceed with caution.
One of the world's last hunter-gatherer tribes has been forced from the forest it called home by a major dam project.
Chinese authorities scramble to cut off information on Hong Kong protests from reaching the mainland.