[QODLink]
Inside Story
Sri Lanka's future
Can the re-elected president deliver on his promises and address post-conflict concerns?
Last Modified: 28 Jan 2010 14:08 GMT

After after a turbulent year and a campaign marred by scandal, Mahinda Rajapakse, the Sri Lankan president, was declared the winner of the country's presidential elections on Wednesday.

He beat his main rival, General Sarath Fonseka by about 1.2 million votes to claim his second term as president.

Several people were killed in the run-up to the vote but election day was relatively peaceful; an outcome that surprised some observers.

But General Fonseka has already pledged to contest the result. His hotel was blockaded by government troops prior to the announcement and he claims that he felt in danger of assassination.

Both Fonseka and Rajapakse played key roles in the defeat of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) after 26 years of civil war.

Eight months later, Rajapakse has a number of challenges on his plate not the least of which is to find a settlement for the 100,000 ethnic Tamils living in makeshift refugee camps in the north of the country.

With a renewed mandate, can  Rajapakse deliver on his promises? How will he address all the countless post-civil war challenges? And will this election solve all of Sri Lanka's many problems?
 
Inside Story presenter Sohail Rahman is joined by Ananth Palakidnar, the deputy news editor at Sri Lanka's Sunday Observer newspaper, Thaya Idaikkadar, a councillor in London's Harrow Borough, and Jonathan Spencer, a professor of anthropology  specialising in South Asia at the University of Edinburgh.

This episode of Inside Story aired from Wednesday, 27 January, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.