[QODLink]
INSIDE IRAQ
Leaving Iraq
Is Iraq stable and able to determine its own future after the withdrawal of US troops?
Last Modified: 08 Aug 2010 14:42 GMT

On August 2, Barack Obama, the US president, declared that the US "combat mission" in Iraq has reached its end.

He told a conference of disabled American veterans in Atlanta, Georgia that more troops will be coming home at the end of August.

This, he said, was in line with the status of forces agreement and his own promises, and he said he would be able to fulfill those promises in part because violence in Iraq continues to be at its lowest in years.

However, the AP news agency reported that July was the deadliest month in Iraq in more than two years. The US military brass rapidly and vehemently denied this.

They issued lower figures of their own and insisted that Iraq is now stable and able to determine its own future after the withdrawal of US troops.

But as Iraq enters its fifth month without a government, Obama's promise of withdrawal may not be all that it seems, and the assessment of Iraq's stability is still confusing.

Our guests this week are John Burkman, a Republican strategist, Saad al-Muttalibi, a member of the State of Law Coalition and a political advisor to the ministry of dialogue and reconciliation, and Sabah al-Mukhtar, the president of the Arab Lawyers Association in the UK.

This episode of Inside Iraq aired from Friday, August 6, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.