[QODLink]
INSIDE IRAQ
Can Biden end political deadlock?
US vice president visits as Iraq's rival parties wrangle over forming a government.
Last Modified: 10 Jul 2010 10:56 GMT



Four months after a pivotal election, Iraq is still without a government.

The initial election results showed the coalition led by a secular candidate, Iyad Allawi, taking a slim lead over the slate of Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki, with 91 seats to 89.

Since the Poll, al-Maliki's State of the Law coalition has joined forces with the Iranian-backed Iraqi National Alliance to form what some analysts call a super Shia coalition. But the partnership has stalled after disagreement on who to pick for the prime minister's post.

Allawi insists that after his two seat win he should be prime minister, especially as his cross sectarian Iraqiya coalition got strong support in the Sunni-dominated provinces.

While rival parties wrangle over who has the right to form a new government, the political impasse has disgusted many ordinary Iraqis, who are deeply cynical about their ruling class. 

Against this backdrop, Joe Biden, the US vice president, made his first visit to Iraq since the election and held talks with both sides. His visit, which coincided with the arrival of three other prominent US senators in Iraq, signaled an American diplomatic surge at a critical moment for Iraq's fledgling democracy.

But will Biden's visit break the impasse? And what are the real reasons for Iraq's political deadlock?

Our guests this week are Sabah Al Mukhtar from the Arab Lawyers Association in the UK, and Joshua Muravchik from the Institute of World Politics in Washington DC.

This episode of Inside Iraq aired from Friday, July 9, 2010.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Featured
Pro-Russia leaders' election in Ukraine's east shows bloody conflict is far from a peaceful resolution.
Critics challenge Canberra's move to refuse visas for West Africans in Ebola-besieged countries.
A key issue for Hispanics is the estimated 11.3 million immigrants in the US without papers who face deportation.
In 1970, only two mosques existed in the country, but now more than 200 offer sanctuary to Japan's Muslims.
Hundreds of the country's reporters eke out a living by finding news - then burying it for a price.