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Fault Lines
Occupy Wall Street: Surviving the winter
Fault Lines follows some of Occupy's key organisers as the movement fights to stay relevant over the winter months.
Last Modified: 28 Mar 2012 06:09

When Occupy Wall Street faced violent police crackdowns around the country, most people thought it had come to an end.

But the protesters had no intention of abandoning a movement that had already brought out thousands of Americans to demand attention to the country’s economic inequalities. Hundreds of protests and actions have continued around the country.

"The economic, political and social conditions continue to deteriorate and as a human being - it doesn't matter where you're from or what your history is - you'll always revolt against that," says Amin Husain, an Occupy organiser.

Fault Lines looks at how Occupy Wall Street continued to build itself through the winter months by following key organisers through planning meetings, days of action and assemblies - and how the movement must battle political co-optation in a US election year.

 

Fault Lines can be seen on Al Jazeera English each week at the following times GMT: Tuesday: 2230; Wednesday: 0930; Thursday: 0330; Friday: 1630; Saturday: 2230; Sunday: 0930; Monday: 0330; Tuesday: 1630.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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