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101 East
Tale of a modern city
How can Indian cities keep up with the nation's dramatic economic boom?
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2011 12:18

India is richer than ever before, and could surpass China's economy by 2013. But its growth is a mix of dynamism and dysfunction as can be seen in the city of Gurgaon.

Gurgaon barely existed 20 years ago. Today it is a booming metropolis of apartment buildings, shopping malls, golf courses and luxury stores. But it lacks basic infrastructure like sewerage, electricity, public transport and roads.

The city suffers from traffic jams and flooding due to poor infrastructure, and those living there say government bodies are struggling to keep up with developers who helped build the city.

Facing inefficient government, corruption and bureaucracy, consumers must provide their own resources, including generators, water tanks, private security and transport, which is leading to growing frustrations.

101 East investigates the highs and lows of India's dramatic economic boom.

 

101 East airs each week at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2230; Friday: 0930; Saturday: 0330; Sunday: 1630.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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