[QODLink]
Middle East

Libya declares oil crisis over

The state reclaims oil ports after a deal reached between the government and a rebel leader.

Last updated: 03 Jul 2014 00:48
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Thinni said the ports had been reclaimed after an agreement with rebel leader Ibrahim Jathran [Reuters]

Libya's acting Prime Minister Abdullah al-Thinni said the government had reached a deal with a rebel leader controlling oil ports to hand over the last two terminals and end a blockade that crippled the OPEC nation's petroleum industry.

"We have successfully reached an agreement to solve the oil crisis. We have received today Ras Lanuf and Es Sider oil ports thankfully without the use of force," Thinni said at Ras Lanuf terminal in eastern Libya. "I officially declare this is the end of the oil crisis."

Thinni said the ports had been reclaimed after an agreement with Ibrahim Jathran, whose fighters had seized the terminals almost a year ago to demand more regional autonomy.

Jathran told reporters that he had handed over the ports as a "goodwill gesture" to the new parliament, which was elected last month.

Taking back the two major eastern oil terminals could make around 500,000 more barrels a day of crude available for export, a major breakthrough for the Libya, whose coffers have been hit hard by oil revenue losses.

The end of the blockade would also see a final chapter of a crisis that included failed negotiations, threats to bombard rebels and even an attempt by Jathran to dispatch an oil tanker that was later boarded on the high seas by US commandos.

Remaining obstacles

Disputes over Libya's vast oil resources have been among the many triggers for conflict between rival brigades of former rebels and allied political factions since civil war ended four decades of Muammar Gaddafi's one-man rule in 2011.

The announcement by Thinni and Jathran appeared to show a more solid agreement to end the oil standoff, but shipments may still face technical delays and past negotiations have been slowed by subsequent political disagreements.

Jathran's rebels and their allies, who were all former state oil protection guards before their mutiny, had agreed in April to reopen the two smaller ports, Zueitina and Hariga, and then gradually free up Es Sider and Ras Lanuf.

After that deal, shipments from Zueitina were delayed because of technical damage from the blockade, while Hariga terminal loaded a tanker of crude at the end of last month.

Storage tanks at seized ports are likely full, and loading initial crude will be straightforward, but getting resupplies from oilfields may be complicated.

Separate protests have also curtailed production at some oilfields, and other groups may still target pipelines and oil facilities to make political or financial demands on a government that struggles to control many parts of the country.

420

Source:
Reuters
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Featured
Referendum on Scottish independence is the first major election in the UK where 16 and 17-year olds get a vote.
Blogger critical of a lack of government transparency faces defamation lawsuit from Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong.
Farmers worry about their future as buyers shun local produce and rivers show an elevated presence of heavy metals.
War-torn neighbour is an uncertain haven for refugees fleeing Pakistan's Balochistan, where locals seek independence.
NSA whistleblower Snowden and journalist Greenwald accuse Wellington of mass spying on New Zealanders.
join our mailing list