[QODLink]
Middle East

Al Jazeera team face questioning in Egypt

Broadcaster welcomes release of cameraman Fawzy, but reiterates demand that all the detained journalists be set free.

Last updated: 02 Jan 2014 00:22
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

Al Jazeera has expressed outrage at the continuing detention of its journalists in Egypt, and is increasingly concerned about the safety of the staff being held without charge.

While cameraman Mohamed Fawzy has been released, producers Mohamed Fahmy and Baher Mohamed, along with correspondent Peter Greste are now being held for the fifth day, since being detained on Sunday without charge.

No news on their release has been given by the authorities in Egypt.

Greste appeared in front of the prosecutor in Cairo for the second time in two days on Tuesday, but is still being detained.

A legal adviser said that Mohamed will be detained in Tora prison, outside Cairo, until he is brought before a prosecutor for questioning. This is due to happen on January 4.

Fahmy, who had been detained in Tora prison, has been moved to a prison hospital where he is being treated for an injury he suffered before his arrest.

Fahmy and Greste are expected to undergo further questioning on Sunday.

'False and unfounded'

Al Anstey, managing director of Al Jazeera English, said: "It is outrageous to be treating bone-fide journalists in this way. The allegations that are being made are totally false and unfounded.

"We operate in Egypt legally. The team were working on a number of stories to show our viewers around the world all aspects of the ongoing situation in the country, and every member of our team has huge experience carrying out the highest quality journalism with integrity."

Doha-based Al Jazeera welcomed the release of Fawzy on Tuesday, but demanded that all the detained journalists be immediately set free.

Heather Allan, head of newsgathering at Al Jazeera English, said: "Peter and the team have been working on a number of stories in Egypt. We reported daily on political events including the recent protests in some universities.

"The team also covered the problems of traffic congestion in Cairo, and the cancellation of the Egyptian football league.We have been covering a variety of different stories from the country as we always do."

Greste is an award-winning journalist who joined Al Jazeera English after working with CNN and BBC. He won the Peabody Award in 2012 for his documentary on Somalia.

Al Jazeera concerned

Fahmy is a producer who worked for CNN and the New York Times prior to joining Al Jazeera.

Mohamed is a journalist who works as a Cairo-based producer for Al Jazeera English.

All three Al Jazeera journalists have upheld the highest standards throughout their careers.

Al Jazeera is increasingly concerned about the safety of its journalists in Egypt.

Two other Al Jazeera journalists, Abdulla al-Shami and Mohamed Badr, have been held without charge for over five months. The network has been also demanding their immediate release.

Several organisations involved in global media freedom have joined the call for their immediate and unconditional release including: Committee for Protection of Journalists, Reporters Without Borders and International News Safety Institute.

488

Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Featured
Pro-Russia leaders' election in Ukraine's east shows bloody conflict is far from a peaceful resolution.
Critics challenge Canberra's move to refuse visas for West Africans in Ebola-besieged countries.
A key issue for Hispanics is the estimated 11.3 million immigrants in the US without papers who face deportation.
In 1970, only two mosques existed in the country, but now more than 200 offer sanctuary to Japan's Muslims.
Hundreds of the country's reporters eke out a living by finding news - then burying it for a price.