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Middle East

Jordanians vote under Syria war shadow

Municipal elections held amid growing anger over impact of massive influx of Syrian refugees on country's economy.

Last Modified: 27 Aug 2013 15:51
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Jordanians have voted in municipal elections amid growing anger over a sluggish economy that is struggling to cope with a massive influx of war refugees from neighbouring Syria.

About 3.7 million Jordanians were registered to pick 100 mayors and 970 municipal councillors from about 3,000 candidates in 94 municipalities.

The Municipal Affairs Minister Walid Masri said that more than 4,000 local and international observers were monitoring the process on Tuesday.

The election has been overshadowed by anger among Jordanians over the impact of more than 500,000 Syrian refugees on their country.

Officials say the influx has placed a huge burden on already overstretched water and power supplies as well as housing and education.

With few candidates of the leftist or nationalist opposition in the race, tribal figures, who are the traditional bedrock of the monarchy, are set to sweep the elections.

The Muslim Brotherhood, the main opposition party, boycotted the polls, charging that despite repeated promises since the Arab Spring of 2011, there has been no meaningful reforms in the country.

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Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
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