[QODLink]
Middle East

One killed at pro-Morsi march in Egypt

Violence comes one day after security officials postpone plan to crack down on Muslim Brotherhood sit-ins.

Last Modified: 14 Aug 2013 00:39
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

At least one person has been killed and many others injured in clashes between supporters and opponents of Egypt's ousted president, Mohamed Morsi, in the capital, Cairo.

Clashes broke out when Morsi supporters came under attack as they marched towards the interior ministry.

Spotlight
Follow our ongoing coverage of the political crisis in Egypt

Supporters of the new military-installed government hurled stones at the marchers and threw bottles at them from balconies on Tuesday, witnesses said. Police then fired tear gas to disperse the crowds.

Al Jazeera's Rawya Rageh, reporting from Cairo, said Morsi supporters had taken their protests to key government buildings in the centre of the capital.

"There were scuffles at least at three different points between protester groups after Morsi supporters surrounded some of the government buildings. They have been throwing bottles and rocks to each other," our correspondent said.

The Muslim Brotherhood said that Egyptian policemen dressed in plain clothes had opened fire with live rounds at one of its marches in Cairo, wounding five people.

A security source said seven protesters had been wounded but added that it was not immediately clear who had opened fire.

A few thousand pro-Morsi protesters were taking part in the march when the scuffles began.

'Terrorists'

Local residents taunted them, calling them "terrorists" and saying they were not welcome before throwing stones at them, the Reuters news agency reported. Morsi's supporters also responded by hurling rocks.

Women and children fled the scene in panic, and two men wielding machetes were seen chasing marchers, Reuters said.

Ten people were injured in fighting in front of the ministry of endowment between local residents and pro-Morsi Muslim scholars working in the ministry, according to the field hospital at Rabaa al-Adaweya, where Morsi supporters are camped out.

According to reports, 12 Morsi supporters were also arrested during the fighting at the ministry. They were accused of trying to break into the building and attacking the ministry's security and government employees.

Morsi supporters also protested in front of several ministries including the ministries of labour and electricity.

Supporters of the deposed president called for more mass demonstrations on Tuesday.

The so-called "Anti-Coup Alliance," which supports Morsi, called for a "million-man demonstration" after the judiciary said on Monday that it was extending his detention for a further 15 days, pending an investigation into his alleged collaboration with the Palestinian group Hamas.

The ongoing standoff with the army-backed interim government, which has threatened to disperse the two Cairo sit-ins where thousands of pro-Morsi protesters have been camped out for over a month, has caused worry among the international community.

Egyptian authorities postponed a move to disperse two Cairo sit-ins on Monday to "avoid bloodshed,'' security sources said.

The protesters are calling for the reinstatement of Morsi, who was overthrown by the military on July 3 and is now being held at an undisclosed location.

501

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
More than one-quarter of Gaza's population has been displaced, causing a humanitarian crisis.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Muslim charities claim discrimination after major UK banks began closing their accounts.
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Featured
Thousands of Houthi supporters have called for the fall of Yemen's government. But what do the Houthis really want?
New ration reductions and movement restrictions have refugees from Myanmar anxious about their future in Thailand.
US lawyers say poor translations of election materials disenfranchise Native voters.
US drones in Pakistan have killed thousands since 2004. How have leaders defended or decried these deadly planes?
Residents count the cost of violence after black American teenager shot dead by white Missouri police officer.
join our mailing list