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Family accuses Egypt army of kidnapping Morsi

Ousted president's family says military kidnapped him and promises to take legal action.

Last Modified: 22 Jul 2013 12:49
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Morsi has been held incommunicado at an undisclosed location since the military coup [AFP]

The family of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi has accused the country's military of "kidnapping" him, and says it holds the military responsible for his safety and security.

The statement is the first from Morsi's family since the military overthrew him on July 3. The deposed president's daughter, Shaimaa, read out the statement at a news conference in Cairo on Monday.

"We are taking local and international legal measures against Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, the leader of the bloody military coup, and his putschist group," Shaimaa Mohamed Morsi told reporters.

Morsi has been held incommunicado at an undisclosed location since the military coup. Government officials have said he is safe and is being held for his own protection.

One of Morsi's sons, Osama, described his father's detention as the "embodiment of the abduction of popular will and a whole nation," and said the family would take all legal actions to end his detention.

"What happened is a crime of kidnapping," said Osama.

"I can't find any legal means to have access to him.

"We warn Abdel-Fatah el-Sissi and his coup leaders against harming the life, health or safety of the legitimate president, our father."

Turbulent year

Supporters of Morsi, who was ousted after a single turbulent year of rule, have pressed demonstrations, holding marches and protests across the country since his fall.

Thousands of Morsi loyalists have been massed in Cairo's Rabaa al-Adawiya square for about three weeks, demanding his reinstatement and denouncing General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, the army chief behind his overthrow.

In addition to the demonstration in Cairo, pro-Morsi protesters also held gatherings in Suez, Alexandria, Fayoum, Minya, Bani Suef, Mansoura, El-Arish and Ismailia. 

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