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Conservative withdraws from Iran election

Gholam-Ali Haddad Adel's decision strengthens position of allies running for president.

Last Modified: 10 Jun 2013 11:55
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Haddad Adel urged voters to 'strictly observe' the criteria set by the Supreme Leader when making their choice [AP]

Conservative former parliament speaker Gholam-Ali Haddad Adel has withdrawn from Iran's presidential election, in a move that will improve the chances of other conservative candidates.

Haddad Adel, had been a member of a coalition of conservative "Principlist" candidates that included Tehran Mayor Muhammad Baqer Qalibaf and former foreign minister Ali Akbar Velayati.

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"With my withdrawal I ask the dear people to strictly observe the criteria of the Supreme Leader of the Revolution [Ayatollah Ali Khamenei] when they vote for candidates," he said on Monday.

Haddad Adel, who is a close adviser and a relative by marriage of Khamenei, did not endorse a single candidate, but called for a hardline conservative victory.

"I advise the dear people to take a correct decision so that either a Principlist wins in the first round, or if the election runs to a second round, the competition be between two Principlists."

Haddad Adel was speaker of parliament from 2005 to 2008, but failed to secure the position again in 2012 when Ali Larijani , the current speaker, obtained the most votes.

Haddad Adel was approved to run in the election last month by the Guardian Council, a vetting body of clerics and jurists, along with seven other men who are largely conservatives close to Khamenei.

The presidential vote on Friday will be Iran's first since 2009.

 

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