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Middle East

Journalist and crew escape captors in Syria

NBC chief correspondent Richard Engel and colleagues fled from captors they say were loyal to Bashar al-Assad's regime.
Last Modified: 18 Dec 2012 15:40
Engel joined NBC in 2003 and was named chief foreign correspondent in April 2008 [AP]

More than a dozen heavily armed gunmen had kidnapped and held NBC's chief foreign correspondent Richard Engel and several colleagues for five days inside Syria, keeping them blindfolded and tied up.

They finally escaped unharmed during a firefight between their captors and anti-regime rebels on Monday.

Speaking to NBC's Today Show one day after the escape, an unshaven Engel said he believes the kidnappers were a Shia militia group loyal to the Syrian government, which is fighting to crush a bloody uprising by rebels.

He said they executed at least one of his rebel escorts on the spot at the time he was captured.

"They kept us blindfolded, bound," said Engel, 39.

"We weren't physically beaten or tortured. A lot of psychological torture, threats of being killed. They made us choose which one of us would be shot first and when we refused, there were mock shootings," he added.

"They were talking openly about their loyalty to the government," said Engel.

Engel said he was told the kidnappers wanted to exchange him and his crew for four Iranian and two Lebanese prisoners being held by the rebels. Late on Monday night, Engel said they were being moved to another location.

"And as we were moving along the road, the kidnappers came across a rebel checkpoint, something they hadn't expected. We were in the back of what you would think of as a minivan,'' he said.

"The kidnappers saw this checkpoint and started a gunfight with it. Two of the kidnappers were killed. We climbed out of the vehicle and the rebels took us. We spent the night with them.''

The team crossed back into neighboring Turkey on Tuesday.

Journalist deaths

NBC did not identify the others who were kidnapped along with Engel. The network said there was no claim of responsibility, no contact with the captors and no request for ransom during the time the crew was missing.

The network also requested a news blackout on reporting Engel's kidnapping, with which many US and international news agencies complied.

The Syrian government has barred most foreign media coverage of the civil war in Syria, which has killed more than 40,000 people since the uprising began in March 2011.

Those journalists the regime has allowed in are tightly controlled in their movements by government minders.

Many foreign journalists sneak into Syria illegally with the help of smugglers.

Several journalists have been killed covering the conflict. Among them are award-winning French TV reporter Gilles Jacquier, photographer Remi Ochlik and Britain's Sunday Times correspondent Marie Colvin.

Anthony Shadid, a correspondent for The New York Times, died after an apparent asthma attack while on assignment in Syria.

449

Source:
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