[QODLink]
Middle East
Egypt prosecutor-general refuses to resign
Abdel Maguid Mahmoud vows to keep post despite president's attempt to remove him after acquittals in Camel Battle case.
Last Modified: 12 Oct 2012 06:45
On February 2, 2011, pro-Mubarak forces riding camels and horses charged activists in Tahrir Square [GALLO/GETTY]

Abdel Maguid Mahmoud, Egypt's prosecutor-general, has rejected a move by President Mohamed Morsi to remove him from his post, a day after all 24 defendants in the Cairo "Camel Battle" case were acquitted, state media has reported.

Mahmoud told Egyptian state media on Thursday that he would remain in post, saying that Morsi' move to remove him was beyond the mandate of the president's powers.

"I remain in my post," Mahmoud said. "According to the law, a judicial body cannot be dismissed by an executive authority."

Hours earlier, Morsi's office announced that he had removed Mahmoud from his post and reassigned him as the country's ambassador to the Vatican. The state broadcaster said the transfer had been made by presidential decree.

Mahmoud was considered to be a remnant of ousted president Hosni Mubarak's regime.

On February 2, 2011, pro-Mubarak forces riding camels and horses, charged into the crowd in Cairo's Tahrir Square. The "Camel Battle" became a symbol of the revolution and Mubarak's efforts to suppress it.

The ruling on Wednesday sparked anger across the country, and Mahmoud was blamed for presenting a weak case to the court.

A presidential spokesperson told Al Jazeera that the decision to reassign Mahmoud was in direct response to the demands of the Egyptian people.

He also said that a fact-finding commission set up by President Morsi earlier in the year would shortly be releasing "more facts and new evidence" that would lead to new cases against additional defendants and retrials.

Protests in Cairo

Earlier on Thursday, hundreds of protesters demonstrated in Cairo against the acquittal of the Mubarak-era officials.

The protesters chanted slogans against the verdict, accusing the judges of "complicity" with the leaders of the former regime. "The people want to purify justice," they shouted.

The Youth Movement of April 6, which were the first to protest against Mubarak and the Muslim Brotherhood, had called for demonstrations on Thursday and Friday, demanding that the accused in this case be "retried."

Various political parties and groups also have called for demonstrations on Friday against the country's Constituent Assembly, to demand that a more representative body be formed and justice be done for protesters killed or tortured last year.

Almost 850 people were killed in the 18 days of popular protests that led to Mubarak's ouster on February 11 last year.

Mubarak and his interior minister Habib al-Adly were both jailed for life for their role in ordering the killings but, to the fury of activists, six top security chiefs who stood trial with them were acquitted.

A number of police accused of the murder of protesters have also been acquitted, raising fears of general impunity for the security forces.

445

Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
More than one-quarter of Gaza's population has been displaced, causing a humanitarian crisis.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Muslim charities claim discrimination after major UK banks began closing their accounts.
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Featured
Students kept from using screen-based technology for five days showed improvement in recognizing emotion, US study says.
Frustration grows in Kiev as pledges to end corruption and abuse of power stagnate after Maidan Square protest.
Thousands of Houthi supporters have called for the fall of Yemen's government. But what do the Houthis really want?
New ration reductions and movement restrictions have refugees from Myanmar anxious about their future in Thailand.
US lawyers say poor translations of election materials disenfranchise Native voters.
join our mailing list