[QODLink]
Middle East
Apology over Lebanon lynching death
Lebanon's justice minister has apologized for an angry mob that killed an Egyptian man accused of murder.
Last Modified: 05 May 2010 12:42 GMT
Muslem's lynching sparked outrage in Cairo, where he was buried last week [AFP]

Lebanon's justice minister has apologised for the lynching of an Egyptian man accused of a quadruple homicide.

Mohammed Muslem, who was accused of killing an elderly couple and their two granddaughters in Ketermaya, died after being attacked by a mob in the village south of Beirut.

Hundreds of Ketermaya residents attacked Muslem last week, while he was being driven by police to re-enact the crime.

He was beaten and stabbed to death, and his body was hung from a pole.

"I would like to personally apologise to the government and people of Egypt for the reaction in the village of Ketermaya, which would not have happened had it not been for the gruesome crime that preceded it," Ibrahim Najjar, Lebanon's justice minister, said in a statement on Tuesday.

Najjar delivered his statement standing next to Mohammed Abdul Hakam, one of Egypt's assistant foreign ministers.

The lynching created tensions between the two countries.

The Lebanese embassy in Cairo reportedly asked for extra protection after an anonymous caller threatened to avenge Muslem's murder, although the embassy later denied those reports.

Muslem was also suspected of raping a 13-year-old girl in Ketermaya earlier this year.

The attack was condemned by a number of Lebanese officials, including Michel Sleiman, the president, and Ziad Baroud, the interior minister.

Lebanon's police chief said that he has taken disciplinary measures against the officers who were escorting Muslem.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Featured
Pro-Russia leaders' election in Ukraine's east shows bloody conflict is far from a peaceful resolution.
Critics challenge Canberra's move to refuse visas for West Africans in Ebola-besieged countries.
A key issue for Hispanics is the estimated 11.3 million immigrants in the US without papers who face deportation.
In 1970, only two mosques existed in the country, but now more than 200 offer sanctuary to Japan's Muslims.
Hundreds of the country's reporters eke out a living by finding news - then burying it for a price.