[QODLink]
Middle East
Egyptians protest over minimum wage
Workers demand an increase in the minimum wage, left unchanged since 1984.
Last Modified: 03 May 2010 18:31 GMT
Analysts say such protests could create more of a political challenge ahead of upcoming elections [AFP]

Hundreds of Egyptian workers have gathered outside Egypt's cabinet building demanding a rise in the minimum wage, which has been set at $6.30 a month since 1984.

The protesters were calling for the government to implement a court order that would boost the minimum wage and help millions of poor cope with rising prices.

About 500 protesters in central Cairo on Sunday chanted: "We need wages that are enough for a month!", while some called for an end to the rule of Hosni Mubarak, Egypt's president for more than 28 years.

The protest is the latest in a series of demonstrations demanding more assistance for poor Egyptians and greater political freedom in the tightly controlled state.

The number of demonstrations by workers has increased from 97 in 2002 to 742 in 2009, according to the Land Centre for Human Rights.

Rising prices

Egypt's economy has grown robustly in recent years, but many people say only the wealthy have benefited.

After a food crisis in 2007 and 2008 that triggered bread shortages and protests, inflation has eased, but workers say their problems endure.

"Prices are rising and workers' wages are declining," Hisham Oakal, a worker from a factory in Egypt's Nile Delta, said during Saturday's demonstration.

"Meat has become a luxury item that most of us cannot afford."

Despite their limited support from Egypt's giant workforce, some political analysts say such protests could spawn new alliances, creating the possibility of political change before next year's presidential elections.

"This is why co-ordinated protests over one unified goal, raising the minimum wage, has the potential to galvanise disparate groups across sectors," Ahmed Naggar, a  leading Egyptian economist, said.

However, for many in Egypt, where UN figures put gross domestic product per capita at $1,780, the call for political change may be secondary to more basic demands for a better income and jobs.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Featured
Pro-Russia leaders' election in Ukraine's east shows bloody conflict is far from a peaceful resolution.
Critics challenge Canberra's move to refuse visas for West Africans in Ebola-besieged countries.
A key issue for Hispanics is the estimated 11.3 million immigrants in the US without papers who face deportation.
In 1970, only two mosques existed in the country, but now more than 200 offer sanctuary to Japan's Muslims.
Hundreds of the country's reporters eke out a living by finding news - then burying it for a price.