[QODLink]
Middle East
US vows 'continued support' in Iraq
Defence officials insist troop withdrawal plan on schedule despite recent violence.
Last Modified: 11 Dec 2009 02:22 GMT
Tuesday's coordinated attacks killed 127 people and left 500 others wounded [Reuters]

Robert Gates, the US defence secretary, has promised Iraq continued US support and insisted that the US withdrawal is on track despite the recent surge in violence.

In a unannounced visit to Baghdad on Thursday, Gates met with Jalal Talabani, the Iraqi president, for over an hour and "offered any assistance the Iraqis may need to deal with the bombings".

Gates' visit comes two days after a co-ordinated wave of bombings across the Iraqi capital killed 127 people on Tuesday.

Around 500 others were wounded in the series of attacks that targeted government institutions.

A scheduled meeting between Gates and Nuri al-Maliki was cancelled because the Iraqi prime minister was involved in a parliamentary questioning over the attacks.

US officials note, however, that the recent attacks have not triggered the kind of sectarian reprisals that they might have in the peak of Iraqi-on-Iraqi violence in 2006-07.

'Tragic reminder'

"The bombings are a tragic reminder it's not over yet. There is still work to be done. This fight has to be carried out on a continuing basis," Geoff Morrell, a Pentagon spokesman, quoted Gates as telling Talabani and other senior Iraqi officials.

Morrell said Gates had also insisted that the delay in Iraqi elections and the bloody attack this week would not derail US troop withdrawal plans.

Morrell said the attacks showed a pattern developing as al-Qaeda in Iraq and other terrorist organisations there "diminished" power and resources".

In video


The US says despite the violence Iraqi leaders are moving the country in the right direction

Large-scale attacks like Tuesday's are "sort of a desperate attempt to stay relevant and to try to destabilise the government of Iraq" and re-launch sectarian violence, he added.

The attackers struck just after Iraqi legislators and political leaders ended weeks of wrangling to set March 7 as the date for the national election, weeks later than the original date in January.

An al-Qaeda-linked insurgent group, Islamic State of Iraq, has claimed responsibility for the bombings and warned of more attacks.

"We are determined to uproot this government and pull down its pillars and target its points of strength," the Sunni group, which considers Shia Muslims like al-Maliki heretics, said on an Islamist website.

"The list of targets will not end until the banner of one God is once again raised over Baghdad."

US military support

Senior US military officials meanwhile have defended the Iraqi forces' efforts even after al-Maliki expressed his displeasure by dismissing his head of security operations in Baghdad.

"It would be tough for any country, any government to prevent these kinds of attacks," said Lieutenant-General Charles Jacoby, the number two US commander in Iraq.

Jacoby said that security vulnerabilities in Baghdad had been exploited in Tuesday's bombings and called it a "complicated'' situation.

"There are some obvious gaps" to Iraq's ability to defend itself, but "they're committed to it," he told reporters.

Jaocoby said US forces "responded very quickly" and provided "crime scene investigation capabilities" when the Iraqi authorities asked for help but were "on track" regarding the pullout plan despite recent developments.

The plan would leave 50,000 US troops in Iraq by the end of August, ahead of a full withdrawal of all forces by the end of 2011.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Private citizens take initiative to help 'irregular' migrants, accusing governments of excessive focus on security.
Indonesia's cassava plantations are being killed by mealybugs, and thousands of wasps have been released to stop them.
Violence in Ain al-Arab has prompted many Kurdish Syrians to flee to Turkey, but others are returning to battle ISIL.
Unelected representatives quietly iron out logistics of massive TPP and TTIP deals among US, Europe, and Asia-Pacific.
Led by students concerned for their future with 'nothing to lose', it remains to be seen who will blink first.