Israel and the UN say Shebaa, occupied during the 1967 Arab-Israeli war, is Syrian.

Damascus and Beirut, which never demarcated borders, claim it is Lebanese.

Hezbollah's weapons

The policy statement was discussed in five days of parliamentary debate which underlined a wide divide over Hezbollah's arsenal.

The ruling majority, backed by the West and most Sunni-led Arab states, nevertheless insists on Hezbollah's disarmament, a move Hezbollah and its political allies reject.

Hezbollah's weapons will be discussed at a later date as part of a "national defence strategy" during a national dialogue to be chaired by Michel Sleiman, Lebanon's president.

The national dialogue is part of the Qatari-mediated deal that ended Lebanon's political conflict.

The policy statement also emphasised the government's commitment to a UN Security Council resolution that ended a 34-day war in 2006 between Hezbollah and Israel.

It also adopted changes to economic policies agreed at an international aid conference held in Paris in 2007.